Eddie "lockjaw" davis eddie lockjaw davis with tommy flanagan trio the tommy flanagan trio straight a


Performers: Menno Daams, Ian Smith, t; Matthias Seuffert, Alan Barnes, reeds; Adrian Fry, tb; Martin Litton, p; Martin Wheatley, g; Alyn Shipton, b; Norman Emberson, d. 2011

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In the 1950s, he was playing with Sonny Stitt , while from 1960 to 1962, he and fellow tenor saxophonist Johnny Griffin led a quintet. From the mid-1960s, Davis and Griffin also performed together as part of The Kenny Clarke-Francy Boland Big Band , along with other, mainly European, jazz musicians. [4]

He played with Cootie Williams, Lucky Millinder, Andy Kirk, Louis Armstrong, and Count Basie, as well as leading his own bands and making many recordings as a leader. He played in the swing, bop, hard bop, Latin jazz, and soul jazz genres. Some of his recordings of the 1940s also could be classified as rhythm and blues.

Clark Terry, the trumpeter, one of his early idols, became Mr. Davis's mentor, and his local reputation grew quickly. Mr. Davis's parents made him turn down early offers to join big bands. But in 1944 the Billy Eckstine band, which then included two men who were beginning to create be-bop -- Charlie Parker on alto saxophone and Dizzy Gillespie on trumpet -- arrived in St. Louis with an ailing third trumpeter. Mr. Davis sat in for two weeks. The experience made him decide to move to New York, the center of the be-bop revolution.


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